Skip to main content

College Research Literacy Summer 2019--Demonstration

For demonstration purposes

Welcome to Week 7: Information Has Value

Information Has Value

This week you will need to complete the following:

  1. Pre-test --  0 points;  @ 2 minute
  2. Introduction to Information Has Value -- 5 points; @ 5 minutes
  3. Video & Quiz -- 5 points; @ 5 minutes
  4. Reading #1: "Scope" & Quiz -- 5 points; @ 15 minutes
  5. Reading #2: "Manage" & Quiz -- 5 points; @ 10 minutes
  6. Tutorial #1: Access Matters & Quiz -- 5 points; @ 15 minutes
  7. Tutorial #2: Information Has Value & Quiz -- 5 points; @ 10 minutes
  8. Learning Activity #1: Personal Information & Privacy Issues  -- 5 points; @ 20 minutes
  9. Learning Activity #2: Copyright vs. Plagiarism & Other Types of Information  -- 5 points; @ 25 minutes
  10. Class Discussion -- 5 points; @ 5 minutes
  11. Conclusion to Information Has Value & Post-Test -- 5 points; @ 10 minutes

A note on the final assignment:

You will have until 8:00 am, Monday, March 11, 2019 to complete and turn in your final assignment in Blackboard.  You will be able to submit the assignment beginning, Monday, February 25, 2019.

There is a tab above with the information for the final assignment along with directions and the grading rubric. The final assignment is worth 200 points, or 33% of your grade overall. 

The learning activities for Week 8 will be available Sunday, February 25, so that you have time to complete them as well before the March 11th deadline. There will be time built in to the Week 8 learning activities to work on your final assignment. 

If you have questions, we advise you to seek answers as soon as possible. It will take time to complete the assignment successfully and well, so please don't wait until the last minute to get started.  Steve & Jeanette

 

Please take the pre-test before completing any of the other activities for this week.

Please watch the introductory video to "Information Has Value" and answer the questions below.

Adapted from: Burkhardt, J. (2016). Teaching information literacy reframed: 50+ framework-based exercises for creating information-literate learners. Chicago: Neal-Schuman.

Please watch the video below and then answer the questions.  It gives an introduction to this week's framework: Information Has Value.

OkStateLibrary. (2016). Inform your thinking: Episode 3 - Information has value. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGq9acIW0gw

Please read the chapter "Scope" and answer the questions.

Please read the chapter "Manage" and answer the questions below. The exercise on page 85 is part of the quiz below.

Also review the Ethics Code from the Newman University 2018-19 Catalog (p. 39) and the consequences for plagiarism located on the NU webpage.

Consequences for plagiarism at Newman University, found at: (https://newmanu.edu/campus-life/student-services/academic-resource-center/plagiarism).

At Newman, students found participating in plagiarism may face the following consequences:

  • An F for the written work
  • An individual faculty member has the right to impose more severe penalties. Infractions of this code may be referred to the Academic Review Board. The university has the right to dismiss a student for this infraction.
  • In real life, plagiarism may result in a person being fired from his or her job.

Please work through the tutorial below and then answer the quiz questions.

Please work through the tutorial below and then answer the quiz questions.

Please complete the learning activity, "Personal Information & Privacy Issues."

If you would like to view the tutorial in a full screen format (recommended): http://newmanu.libwizard.com/issues 

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will learn about privacy issues
  • Students will consider how privacy issues impact their lives
  • Students will learn about how personal information is gathered by companies, government agencies and the like
  • Students will learn how that information has value for the groups that collect it

Adapted from: "Personal Information and Privacy" (p. 134-5) and "Privacy Issues" found in Burkhardt, J. (2016). Teaching information literacy reframed: 50+ framework-based exercises for creating information-literate learners. Chicago: Neal-Schuman.
 

Please complete the learning activity, "Plagiarism & Copyright."

If you would like to view the tutorial in a full screen format (recommended): http://newmanu.libwizard.com/copyright

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will learn to define plagiarism; why 'borrowed words' and 'borrowed ideas' need to be properly acknowledged and cited
  • Students will learn the difference between quoting and summarizing and how either, if not done correctly, constitutes plagiarism
  • Students will understand the basic concepts of plagiarism and copyright and the difference between committing plagiarism and copyright infringement
  • Students will become aware of common misconceptions about copyright law and plagiarism

Adapted from:

Bravender, P., & Schaub, G. (2015). Recognizing plagiarism. In P. Bravender, H. McClure, & G. Schaub (Eds.), Teaching information literacy threshold concepts: Lesson plans for librarians (pp. 163–165). Chicago: Association of College & Research Libraries.

Bravender, P. (2015). Plagiarism v. copyright infringement. In P. Bravender, H. McClure, & G. Schaub (Eds.), Teaching information literacy threshold concepts: Lesson plans for librarians (pp. 157–162). Chicago: Association of College & Research Libraries.

You will need to login to our Blackboard class to participate in our class discussion.  Please answer the question posted and interact with other students' or instructors' posts to receive credit.

This week's discussion question:

Question: Were you aware of the types of information that companies gather when you shop or sign up for a service? Will anything that you do change based on what you learned this week?

There are special exceptions and conditions when we talk about copyright.  Some of the more commonly used phrases related to copyright that you might have heard of or be familiar with are:

  • creative commons
  • fair use
  • public domain, and
  • open access

Let's take a brief look at each of these issues so that you will have a basic familiarity with each of them. Watch and read the information below and answer the questions.

Creative Commons is a relatively new way that has been developed so that people have a way to share the information, ideas and more that they have created, mostly in online formats.  Many of the videos, tutorials, photos, and also are textbook are available to us to use due to Creative Commons licenses.

When considering what you can and can't use, you should keep guidelines for fair use in mind. When you are citing books, journal articles, videos, newspapers, research studies, websites, and more in your papers, citing and giving attribution generally constitutes fair use.  When you attempt to sell or make money from the use of copyrighted information or prevent the copyright holder the rights to their fair profits, that is where what you are doing becomes problematic.

Part of the reason that the library pays for access to research databases is to pay the copyright fees so that you and your fellow students can access and use the information for research papers and other projects without worrying about copyright infringement.

Works that are in the public domain are items whose copyright has expired or have been created by government entities. Many think that you do not have to attribute sources if they are in the public domain.  This is false. You still have to attribute, but you don't have to pay for use of the materials or worry as much about copyright infringement.  As always, what you intend to do with the copyrighted material is what will make a difference in each individual situation.

While open access journal articles are great, they can sometimes be tricky to locate unless you are already familiar with the title of a particular one. Fortunately, as these gain in popularity and use, databases are beginning to include them in their collections so that they may be searched along with other high-quality peer-reviewed research. Most often, they are impossible to tell apart from closed-access articles and are available as a pdf file download.

You will have until 8:00 am, Monday, July 29, 2019 to complete and turn in your final assignment in Blackboard.  You will be able to submit the assignment beginning, Monday, July 15, 2019.

Linked below is a sample annotated bibliography that you can use as a guide to complete the final assignment and the directions for completing it successfully.  Also linked is the grading rubric that we will use. The final assignment is worth 200 points, or 1/3 of your grade overall.

The learning activities for Week 8 will be available no later than Monday, July 15, so that you have time to complete them as well before the July 29th deadline. There will be time built in to the Week 8 learning activities to work on your final assignment.

If you have questions, we advise you to seek answers as soon as possible. It will take time to complete the assignment successfully and well, so please don't wait until the last minute to get started.  Steve & Jeanette